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A Geometric Approach to Making Plushie Patterns by Diffeomorphism A Geometric Approach to Making Plushie Patterns by Diffeomorphism

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Here's something that I've been wanting to write up for a while, but never got around to for a couple of months. A lot of people have asked me about the techniques I use when patterning, so in this document lays out in (somewhat excruciating) detail the general approach I take when designing plushies. In general, methodical guides to making patterns are rather lacking on deviantART; I've seen a lot of guides offer only very simplistic advice like "trace out the body shape" without going any further, so this document is an attempt to expand on the varieties of techniques you can use to improve your patterns without having to sculpt foam or anything like that.

I understand that this is a very dense and verbose writeup and that it's likely to confuse a decent amount of people, especially since a lot of my examples are rather abstract and a lot of my images are drawn in MS Paint. If someone out there would like to become my personal editor for any future tutorials I write, I'd love to hear from you =P In all seriousness, If there's anything in particular I can attempt to clarify, please leave me a comment! If enough people ask me the same question, I may eventually update the tutorial with new details and clarifications.

This guide is intended for people who have already put together one or two plushies; if you're a complete beginner looking to get into making plushies, check out my completely non-technical beginner's guide!
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Given 2014-03-26
A Geometric Approach to Making Plushie Patterns by Diffeomorphism

The suggester said: "Diffeomorphism has put an extraoadinary amount of effort into constructing this amazingly useful and well thought-out guide for people who want to get into plush making! It's very clever and well-written, and represents a huge amount of time input by them!" ( Suggested by SilkenCat and Featured by cakecrumbs )
:iconturtlechap:
Turtlechap Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nice! Geometry really is in everything as my teacher had put it. Thank you! :D
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:icondaiin:
daiin Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2014  Professional General Artist
Wow. I mean just...wow. *.* When I went hunting for instructions on how to design and make patterns for plushies, I didn't imagine I'd find something like this! I appreciate your effort and congratulate you on your DD - it's well deserved!
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:icondiffeomorphism:
Diffeomorphism Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
No problem, glad I could help!
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:iconlunaflyaway:
lunaflyaway Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014
I- Wow! This has got to be the most useful pattern tutorial I've found! The detail you go into is really helpful an leaves nothing unclear or to thought! So thank you for posting this!
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:icondiffeomorphism:
Diffeomorphism Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
No problem! Funny though, I thought I left plenty of stuff sorta vague =P
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:iconlunaflyaway:
lunaflyaway Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014
It was rather detailed, which is nice. I love to draw and sew, and I wanted to make a human glados like the one in my gallery~
I really needed the tips :iconanimesweatdropplz:
Any tips for human Plushies?
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:icondiffeomorphism:
Diffeomorphism Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I must admit I don't have any tips on humans in particular, I'm more of a fantasy creature plusher myself =P Patterning a basic human shouldn't be too hard though, I'd imagine you could have a simple spherical-ish head and a simple body pattern and hide most of the body under clothing. Of course I don't know how to make clothes for plushies so that's a moot point, haha.
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:iconlunaflyaway:
lunaflyaway Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014
Thanks XD
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:iconshirley448:
shirley448 Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Thank you so much for sharing your methods--very helpful indeed even though the math is tough to get through!  Especially since I've been out of school for more than 30 years! Lol! I have a question that I've been searching for the answer to and my gut tells me there is a very simple solution that I haven't yet run across.  Can you tell me the process of figuring out how to make a shape like a cone but with the tip cut off?  I make felt food and often I've needed that sort of shape and have had to resort to finding something of similar size & shape that I can wrap paper around, mark and then flatten.  I'm talking about things like a cup, flat bottomed ice cream cone, angel food cake...  I understand the shape those things require but not how to get it without basically draping something else.  I would very much appreciate your input if you have time.
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:icondiffeomorphism:
Diffeomorphism Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Well, let's see. To make something that's cup-shaped, I would use a similar approach to the cone pattern. You have two circular pieces to deal with: one representing the base of the cone, and a smaller one representing the "cut off" part of the cone. Let's say the circle representing the "cut off" part of the cone has a radius 1/2 of the base circle. Then you would use a similar 4 piece approach for the sides of the cone, except each of the 4 pieces would look trapezoidal instead of triangular, where the top of the trapezoid would be 1/2 of the length of the bottom of the trapezoid. That's how I would go about it. If you need more clarification, let me know, I could hastily sketch out a diagram or something =)
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